World Diabetes Day, What You Need To Know About Diabetes

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Insulin pioneer celebrated in World Diabetes Day Google Doodle

Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body’s cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience polyuria (frequent urination), they will become increasingly thirsty (polydipsia) and hungry (polyphagia).

  • Type 1 Diabetes – the body does not produce insulin. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1.
  • Type 2 Diabetes – the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function. Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are of this type.
  • Gestational Diabetes – this type affects females during pregnancy.
  • The most common diabetes symptoms include frequent urination, intense thirst and hunger, weight gain, unusual weight loss, fatigue, cuts and bruises that do not heal, male sexual dysfunction, numbness and tingling in hands and feet.
  • If you have Type 1 and follow a healthy eating plan, do adequate exercise, and take insulin, you can lead a normal life.
  • Type 2 patients need to eat healthily, be physically active, and test their blood glucose. They may also need to take oral medication, and/or insulin to control blood glucose levels.
  •  Gestational diabetesThis type affects females during pregnancy. Some women have very high levels of glucose in their blood, and their bodies are unable to produce enough insulin to transport all of the glucose into their cells, resulting in progressively rising levels of glucose.Diagnosis of gestational diabetes is made during pregnancy.

    All types of diabetes are treatable. Diabetes type 1 lasts a lifetime, there is no known cure. Type 2 usually lasts a lifetime, however, some people have managed to get rid of their symptoms without medication, through a combination of exercise, diet and body weight control.

Patients with type 1 are treated with regular insulin injections, as well as a special diet and exercise.

Patients with Type 2 diabetes are usually treated with tablets, exercise and a special diet, but sometimes insulin injections are also required.

If diabetes is not adequately controlled the patient has a significantly higher risk of developing complications.

Below is a list of possible complications that can be caused by badly controlled diabetes:

  • Eye complications – glaucoma, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, and some others.
  • Foot complications – neuropathy, ulcers, and sometimes gangrene which may require that the foot be amputated
  • Skin complications – people with diabetes are more susceptible to skin infections and skin disorders
  • Heart problems – such as ischemic heart disease, when the blood supply to the heart muscle is diminished
  • Hypertension – common in people with diabetes, which can raise the risk of kidney disease, eye problems, heart attack and stroke
  • Mental health – uncontrolled diabetes raises the risk of suffering from depression, anxiety and some other mental disorders
  • Hearing loss – diabetes patients have a higher risk of developing hearing problems
  • Gum disease – there is a much higher prevalence of gum disease among diabetes patients
  • Gastroparesis – the muscles of the stomach stop working properly
  • Ketoacidosis – a combination of ketosis and acidosis; accumulation of ketone bodies and acidity in the blood.
  • Neuropathy – diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage which can lead to several different problems.
  • HHNS (Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome) – blood glucose levels shoot up too high, and there are no ketones present in the blood or urine. It is an emergency condition.
  • Nephropathy – uncontrolled blood pressure can lead to kidney disease
  • PAD (peripheral arterial disease) – symptoms may include pain in the leg, tingling and sometimes problems walking properly
  • Stroke – if blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and blood glucose levels are not controlled, the risk of stroke increases significantly
  • Erectile dysfunction – male impotence.
  • Infections – people with badly controlled diabetes are much more susceptible to infections
  • Healing of wounds – cuts and lesions take much longer to heal

Controlling blood sugar through diet, oral medications, or insulin is the main treatment. Regular screening for complications is also required.

Type 1- Treatment consists of insulin

Treatment aims at maintaining normal blood sugar levels through regular monitoring, insulin therapy, diet, and exercise.
Medications-Insulin, Dietary supplement, and Hormone therapy
Self-care- Nutrition counseling, Carbohydrate counting, Diabetic diet, and Physical exercise
Type 2
Treatments include diet, exercise, medication, and insulin therapy.
Medications
Anti-Diabetic medication, Blood thinners, Statin, and Insulin
Self-care
Physical exercise, Smoking cessation, Weight loss, Nutrition counseling, Diabetic diet, and Dietary fiber.
Prediabetes
Treatment consists of self care
Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn’t inevitable. With lifestyle changes, weight loss, and medications, it’s possible to bring a blood sugar level back to normal.
Medications
Anti-Diabetic medication
Controls the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood.
Self-care
Physical exercise, Weight loss, Low carbohydrate diet, Mediterranean diet, Low fat diet, and Diabetic diet
Gestational diabetes
Treatment strategies include daily blood sugar monitoring, a healthy diet, exercise, and monitoring the baby. If blood sugar is too high, medication is needed.
Medications
Anti-Diabetic medication and Insulin
Self-care
Healthy diet, Diabetic diet, and Physical exercise
Frederick Banting was the first physician to use insulin to treat humans CNET wrote.

Google marked World Diabetes Day on Monday with a tribute to the first physician and scientist to use insulin on humans, Frederick Banting.

The Doodle celebrating Banting is a simple, mustard-hued cartoon with one “o” in Google replaced by an insulin bottle. It also features a portrait of Banting and a medical diagram of a human with the pancreas highlighted.

Banting’s interest in the pancreas first sparked his work in treating diabetes. Originally he used insulin extracted from dogs to treat patients, and later switched to cows and pigs. It wasn’t until the late 20th century that genetically engineered bacteria became the primary commercial source of bacteria.

 

Banting remains to this the youngest Nobel laureate in the area of physiology and medicine.

 

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