Knock Knock! Open Up For Ways To De-Stress Your Weekend.


Finally Friday is here, you’ve all been working all week and you’re probably feeling drained out by now looking forward to the weekends. It also has a direct effect on your mood and behavior, leading to symptoms like anxiety, restlessness, and lack of motivation, irritability, unnecessary anger, sadness, depression and social withdrawal. What have you planned so far to avoid this? To have your energy back again during the coming two days. With these simple home remedies to be mentioned below you can once again regain your strength to the coming week. Especially if you have been feeling stressed out and anxious for the past week these remedies will help you have a clear head. To cleanse yourself from all the work load your mind has been weighed down with.

1.Chamomile Tea

Chamomile is an effective herb for reducing stress. Its calming and soothing nature has a sedative effect on the central nervous system. It helps relax the muscles, ease anxiety and promote better sleep. You can drink up to 4 cups of chamomile tea a day to fight stress. To make the tea, add 2 teaspoons of dried chamomile to a cup of hot water. Cover and steep for 10 minutes. Strain, add raw honey as per taste and drink it.

2. Get hot

Ever wonder why you feel so relaxed after a spell in the sauna or a steam room? Heating up your body reduces muscle tension and anxiety, research finds. Sensations of warmth may alter neural circuits that control mood, including those that affect the neurotransmitter serotonin. Warming up may be one of the ways that exercise—not to mention curling up by a fire with a cozy cup of tea—boosts mood.

As one group of researchers put it, “Whether lying on the beach in the midday sun on a Caribbean island, grabbing a few minutes in the sauna or spa after work, or sitting in a hot bath or Jacuzzi in the evening, we often associate feeling warm with a sense of relaxation and well-being.”

3. The 21-minute cure

Twenty-one minutes: That’s about how long it takes for exercise to reliably reduce anxiety, studies show, give or take a minute. “If you’re really anxious and you hop on a treadmill, you will feel more calm after the workout,” Dr. Ramsey says.

“I generally ask my patients to spend 20 to 30 minutes in an activity that gets their heart rate up, whether it’s a treadmill or elliptical or stair stepping—anything you like. If you rowed in college, get back to rowing. If you don’t exercise, start taking brisk walks.”

4. Dark chocolate

A regular healthy indulgence (just a bite, not a whole bar!) of dark chocolate might have the power to regulate your stress levels. “Research has shown that it can reduce your stress hormones, including cortisol,” Sass says. “Also, the antioxidants in cocoa trigger the walls of your blood vessels to relax, lowering blood pressure and improving circulation. And finally, dark chocolate contains unique natural substances that create a sense of euphoria similar to the feeling of being in love!” Go for varieties that contain at least 70% cocoa.

5. Seeds

Flaxseed, pumpkin seeds, and sunflower seeds are all great sources of magnesium (as are leafy greens, yogurt, nuts, and fish). Loading up on the mineral may help regulate emotions. “Magnesium has been shown to help alleviate depression, fatigue, and irritability,” Sass says. “Bonus: When you’re feeling especially irritable during that time of the month, the mineral also helps to fight PMS symptoms, including cramps and water retention.”

6. Give yourself a scalp massage

You know how good it feels when you get your hair shampooed at the salon? You can (and should) recreate that experience at home. To melt away tension, massage your scalp with your fingertips, moving from your hairline to the back of your head several times. Bonus: Scalp massages also help release natural conditioning oils so your hair will look even more gorgeous.

7. Avoid caffeine

Caffeine is a stimulant that increases adrenaline in the body, the very hormone you are looking to reduce. Avoid coffee (decaf is OK), colas, guarana, chocolate, and more than 2 cups of tea daily.

 8.Give your thumbs a rest.

Thanks to e-mail and cell phones, it seems like your job never ends. The increasingly blurry boundaries between work and home life leave us with less downtime than ever before (and in some cases, no downtime!). Advances in technology are a leading source of chronic stress, putting many of us in a constant state of alert. Not to mention the effect it has on family ties.
To make technology work for you, screen calls with caller ID or, better yet, limit your cell phone and e-mail use to working hours only. Set a regular time you’ll check it in the evening (say, after dinner), so you’re not constantly disrupting home life to keep tabs on work.


Gardening is a rewarding hobby and a great stress reliever. Simply being out in nature is an enjoyable experience that soothes your soul. The sounds, the smell, the breeze and the sunlight—all of these help calm your mind and improve your mood. Plus, the repetitive nature of gardening tasks soothe your mind.

Scientists suggest that the bacteria in soil may help activate brain cells to produce the neurotransmitter serotonin that works like an antidepressant. Researchers believe the bacteria in soil can help increase learning behavior, too.

Gardening also contributes to your physical health as activities like digging, planting, weed pulling and harvesting strengthen your bones and muscles.

10. Rethink Sunday Night

Research shows that we remember unpleasant experiences as significantly worse if we expect them to recur, which may explain why so many of us ruin Sunday evening by dreading the week ahead. Instead, plan one of the above activities for Sunday night: You’ll fall asleep with a fond new memory—not a crash of nerves.

Have a great weekend!