A Girl With No Fear


The girl was only two years old when her mom died. She started living only with her dad. But life had become tougher and tougher for them as time passes. They found out that it is difficult to pay for the house they had rented and at the same time to feed themselves three times a day. Her dad started working day and night but their situation even get worse. It becomes hard for her to go to school and attend classes because she had nothing to eat at lunch time and became afraid her friends might tease her. She is always puzzled why some people don’t try to understand others by being on their shoes.

One day when she returned from school she found out that the house which they had rented has been taken over by somebody else because they couldn’t pay for two consecutive  months. They had no place to go but to the church and spent the night there. At that time she was ten years old. They shivered the whole night begging God to do something. That night had really taught her a dozen of things. She knew that everything in life couldn’t be given as a gift unless one try and work hard until death. I was amazed and over the moon when she told me that she planned to collect fruits and vegetables and sell on the street. She keep up her hard work with her dad. Through time they rent a house and save some money. The girl I am talking about is now fifteen years old who has her own shop which her dad keeps while she is in school. I met her personally last summer in Mekelle on a camp. She said these to me which always pop-up in m head whenever I am sad or on my way to give up. “Even though sadness proceeds I always knew that happiness will follow it. The past fifteen years in my life has taught me to become a strong girl. One day I become sad and the next day I will become happy. Today I might be happy but tomorrow I may be sad. The pain I had inside grows deeper and becomes sadness. The only thing I can do to change the sadness to happiness is by having faith in God. Rather than crying I started working because that was the way I could dry up my tears. But if I don’t I will fail. And if I fail, am I going to wait again for someone who is going to tip me back?”

This story is true. She had tears in her eyes the day she told me. But those tears were not weak with fear rather a sign of strength. I just hope that one day; her life could inspire someone else.

Eden Binega is a journalist and mentor in Center for Creative Leadership. She used to be a host in 105.3 AFRO FM radio Station and a reporter in Mazarot magazine.